Politics

Here’s the real problem with Judge Moore staying in the Senate race

Senator Al Franken has announced that he’ll be resigning his Senate seat soon — in the coming weeks. (Probably.) But he couldn’t help but take a jab at Roy Moore on his way out.

Reuters reports:

“I know in my heart that nothing I’ve done as a senator – nothing – has brought dishonor on this institution,” Franken said. “Nevertheless, today I am announcing that in the coming weeks, I will be resigning as a member of the United States Senate.”

Franken is one of several prominent American men in politics, media and entertainment to be accused in recent months of sexual harassment and misconduct.

“Some of the allegations against me are simply not true. Others I remember very differently,” Franken said.

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Franken is essentially pleading nolo contendere. He has accepted his resignation, but admitted to nothing. I think the main thing most people are remembering clearly is that photo with his hands on the breasts of a sleeping model and sports correspondent.

On his way out, he jabbed at Roy Moore and President Trump:

“I, of all people, am aware that there is some irony in the fact that I am leaving while a man who has bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault sits in the Oval Office and a man who has repeatedly preyed on young girls campaigns for the Senate, with the full support of his party,” he said.

First of all, Moore doesn’t have the full support of his party. Republican Paul Ryan reiterated that he still thinks Moore should drop out of the race.

“He should step aside,” he said. “If he cares about the values and the people who he claims to care about, then he should step aside.”

A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MOORE AND FRANKLIN

Ten days before the runoff for the special election held in Atlanta between Republican Karen Handel and liberal Jon Ossoff to fill a recently vacated House seat, Democratic hopes for victory were high. Some media reports pumped polling results that showed liberal candidate Ossoff as many as nine points ahead of Handel. Portrayed as a “dead heat” at the time, Ossoff went down in flames.

So did Hillary, despite media projections that showed her emerging victorious — right up until the results began rolling in.

For the Alabama Senate Race, the big headline is that it’s so close now that Moore might lose.

In Alabama, a Democrat is running against Moore. Democrats have no hope in Alabama. The last Democrat was elected in 1992, and he turned Republican just two years later.

A politician like Al Franken was elected based on the best information available to the voters at the time. The citizens of Minnesota had no idea that he liked to grope women when they voted for him. But now, as the stories have emerged, Franken has been judged in the court of public opinion and retroactively disqualified.

Moore, on the other hand, hasn’t been voted on yet. The voters still have the decision in front of them. Nobody has actually pressed charges against Roy Moore, so there’s no criminal trial. This is being tried purely in the court of public opinion. It is up to the voters to decide if they will be satisfied with Moore, or else if they prefer a pro-abortion liberal.

The Democrats and RINOs hate Moore. They want him to quit before election day in order to take the choice away from the voters. They don’t want to give them the opportunity to vote for him.

HE MIGHT WIN

I think it’s because they’re afraid the voters are going to vote him into office, in spite of the allegations against him. And when he gets there, he is not going to play ball. That’s because he has a higher view of the law than the other politicians do. Some liberals haven’t lost sight of this, like this MSNBC pundit:

Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore should have been disqualified from running for the Senate well before questions about sexual misconduct were raised, MSNBC contributor George Will said Thursday.

The veteran pundit noted that Moore has twice been tossed off the bench of his state Supreme Court, and argued that his record disqualified him from swearing an oath to the Constitution.

“The charges of sexual predation are distracting us from something that happened earlier — that this is a man who has twice been thrown off the bench in Alabama for his dislike of the American Constitution, his refusal to — well, actually theocratic position that his religious conscience trumps the Constitution,” Will said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

Let me repeat that: “his religious conscience trumps the Constitution.” What that translates into is this: Moore believes Biblical law trumps man’s law, and when man’s law conflicts with Biblical law, Moore will choose Biblical law.

This is infuriating to Liberals.

But in Democracy, the religion of the liberals, the majority speaks. And this means Moore has a chance.

If Moore drops out, this will make the Democrats happy because they’ll get their first Alabama senator in over 20 years. It will make the RINOs like Paul Ryan happy because they are only pretending to be Conservatives anyway.

Paul Ryan says Moore ought to quit if he “cares about the values” of the people. What Ryan really means to say is this: “Please quit now, because we think the voters might be stupid enough to elect you, just like they did Trump.”

Which might be why Trump has broken his silence and endorsed Moore. He senses a fellow rebel against the Establishment system. He wants Moore on his side if he wins.

And that’s the real problem with Judge Moore staying in the Senate race — the liberals are afraid he’s going to win.

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